Nancy Lelewer Author of Something's Not Rigt and The Lelewer Legacy

Something’s Not Right


Description

SOMETHING’S NOT RIGHT: One family’s struggle with learning disabilities, an Autobiography by Nancy Lelewer is the story of a mother’s determination to get the appropriate education for all four of her bright children, three of whom have dyslexia and attention deficit disorder, one, her only son, also has additional neurological problems. The children are close in age—the four were born within five years.

The book covers over a thirty-two year period from the time Ms. Lelewer is pregnant with her son, who as a fetus shakes inside her, to his being employed and married with two daughters.

SOMETHING’S NOT RIGHT deals primarily with the author’s son about whom she was frequently given poor advice by the “experts.” Being dyslexic herself and having had to figure out by herself how she best took in, retained and then was able to use the information she had stored, she began to explore her children’s learning styles. The author developed games, a calendar and other programs to help her children learn while searching for people who knew something about dyslexia, ADHD and ADD.

In time she found a superb tutor who led her to a teacher and a diagnostician. This led to schools for her son and eventually to The Linden Hill School, a structured, nurturing boarding school for boys with learning differences.

Ms. Lelewer describes all the setbacks she, her son and daughters faced. What worked and what didn’t work.

In the afterword is a page listing the six items vital to dealing successfully with learning disabilities. Today the author believes the list applies also to those with Asperger’s Syndrome.

SOMETHING’S NOT RIGHT: One family’s struggle with learning disabilities has been used as a text by many college and graduate programs, read by thousands of teachers, parents, dyslexics, non-dyslexics and assigned as summer reading for high school students.

Research continues to show that approximately 15 percent of all school children have learning disabilities. However, only 5 percent of school children are identified as having a learning disability. The remaining 10 percent are missed given a failure to recognize that they are struggling or that their academic or behavior problems are connected to specific difficulties with learning. SOMETHING’S NOT RIGHT: One family’s struggle with learning disabilities is as current today as it was when it came out in 1994.

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